Sterol

Sterol
Sterol

one sterol is a specific type of lipid which consists of four fused carbon rings with one oxygen molecule at the end. the prototypical sterol is cholesterol which has been highly studied for its health effects. steroids such as hormones estrogen and testosterone are also considered to be sterols. ergosterol is a fungal sterol synthesis which acts as a target for antifungal medication whereas phytosterols are plant compounds sterols. hopanoids is bacterial compounds share some similarities with sterols.
While cholesterol can be obtained from the diet most of the body’s cholesterol synthesized by the liver from saturated fat that has been consumed. some forms of cholesterol can travel in the blood. varying forms of these drugs have radically different effects on human health.
low- density lipoprotein (LDL) is called bad cholesterol. this name due to the fact that it can set the walls of blood vessels and increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. In contrast high density lipoproteins (HDL) binds to the extra blood cholesterol and transfer it to the liver where it is removed from the system. For these reasons the relationship between these two types of cholesterol important than the amount of total cholesterol.
ergosterol serves a function analogous to cholesterol but in fungal cell membranes. since it is not present in humans the enzyme that synthesizes the make attractive targets for antifungals. several classes of drugs used clinically as ergosterol biosynthetic inhibitors to treat fungal infections in humans and as fungicides on plants. Some of these compounds are also used to treat protozoal infections such as West African sleeping sickness.
Phytosterol is a type of sterol found in plants and is primarily obtained in the diet from plant oils. there is evidence that it can prevent cholesterol from being absorbed in the intestine. there is some concern however that it can also interfere with the absorption of important nutrients. Examples of phytosterols are campesterol and sitosterol.
hopanoids are compounds found in bacterial membranes. they are not sterols but fused ring structures that share partial correspondence with these compounds. hopanoids serve a function in bacterial membranes similar to that of cholesterol in animal membranes.